Five Real Estate Rental Property Expenses Not To Forget

real estate rental property expenses

Here’s a list of five real estate rental property expenses not to forget about when calculating your ROI.

As a good real estate accountant or bookkeeper will say, ‘Report all of your income and expense as much as you can’.

Tenant Credit Reports

Checking the credit and background of prospective tenants is a must-do and one of the most important tips for a real estate landlord or property manager.

While the cost of running an individual report is small, the annual real estate expense for credit reports can really add up.  Especially if you have a large multi family property or several single family rental homes.

Leasing Fees

Surprisingly, many beginning real estate investors overlook expensing out the finder’s fee paid for leasing the rental property.

One reason this happens is that the leasing agent will collect the upfront monies from the tenant – such as the first month’s rent and security deposit – then remit to the owner this money less the leasing fee paid out of those upfront monies.

The landlord mistakenly only accounts for the money he or she actually receives instead of the gross income from the tenant.

Back Office Property Management Time

The time spent on little tasks like answering incoming phone calls, balancing the bank statement, and endorsing rental checks can really add up over the course of a year.

One way to account for this time spent managing your real estate investment is to use a stop watch or timer on your computer.  Then, log the minutes on a spreadsheet along with the date and a brief description of the task.

Onsite Property Management

Just as with the back office time, onsite property management time can add up as well.  It’s also one of the most overlooked real estate rental property expenses.

This category includes tasks such as driving by or walking the property, meeting a vendor onsite, and checking out the competition.

Market Research

Speaking of the competition, don’t forget to expense the time spent researching your market.

This can include things such as dues and subscriptions, property drive-bys, shopping the competition, and online research.

Common Real Estate Rental Property Expenses

Some of the most common expenses with a real estate investment property include:

Real Estate Time Management Tips

real estate time management tips

Here are two real estate time management tips to help take running your real estate business to the next level.

Emails Take A Lot Of Time

There are certain tasks in any business that are affectionately called ‘time sucks‘.

Time sucks are things that, well, take up a lot of time without giving you anything in return.  Like more income, for example.

Email can be a huge time suck in any business, but especially in real estate.  That’s because real estate agents only get paid when a deal is done . . . and not by the hour or on a salary.

Even for correspondence that is time sensitive, checking, sending & receiving emails should be limited to two or three times each day.  Many people schedule their email times for first thing in the morning.  Then again around lunchtime, and toward the end of the day.

Have A Routine & Stick To It

Another good real estate time management tip is to have a routine and stick to it.

Devote a certain amount of time each day – at the same time each day – to tasks such as real estate marketing & prospecting, or client outreach, and administrative work.

Remember, having a successful real estate business isn’t about how many hours you work each day.

It’s about how smart you work!

How To Make Your Real Estate Business Plan Better

real estate business plan

Having a real estate business plan – or a property management business plan  is crucial if you want to succeed in the business of real estate.

That’s because real estate is about much more than just buying & selling, leasing & managing.

Here are the top two ways to make your real estate business plan better.

Rainmakers Should Make Rain Not Train

Some real estate brokers are rainmakers.  They’re the ones who bring in the majority of the business and are great in dealing with clients.

If that’s the case, bring in a partner or key employee to recruit, train and manage the newly-hired real estate agents.

New agents will be attracted by the broker-rainmaker’s outstanding success stories.  But new real estate agents usually lack experience, skill or motivation.

They won’t be able to perform  and produce without having a lot of hands-on guidance – at least to begin with.  The broker-rainmaker won’t be able to give new agents the attention they deserve because they’re out there making rain and bringing in new business.

A Great Real Estate Business Plan Is Niche Specific

Focusing on a specific asset class for your real estate business is much easier than trying to be all things to all people.

A real estate asset class isn’t just commercial or residential real estate.  A asset class is a specific category – or niche – within those sectors.

If you have a residential real estate brokerage, concentrating on specific zip codes or neighborhoods is one example of a niche.  Another is focusing on a certain product type such as small multifamily or fix-n-flips.

Commercial real estate brokers could identify high-tech industrial property, medical office buildings, or STEM tenants as their niche.  Or they could concentrate on finding replacement property for 1031 tax deferred exchanges.